Blog Archives

The Greatest POW Escape in American History

Greatest Escape in American History

by Stephen Dando-Collins Eisenhower’s aide, Patton’s son-in-law, Hemingway’s son: The Greatest POW Escape in American History Tall, thin Lieutenant Craig D. Campbell, from Austin, Texas was among the first Americans to arrive at the Nazi’s Oflag 64 POW camp at Schubin,

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Posted in Military History

Operation Chowhound: As Historically Important as D-Day

Operation Chowhound

by Stephen Dando-Collins Seventy years ago, in February, 1945, 3.5 million Dutch civilians in German-occupied Holland, in cities such as Amsterdam, Rotterdam and The Hague, were facing starvation after the Nazis had cut food and power, creating Holland’s ‘Hunger Winter’

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Posted in Military History

The Final Outcome: Braddock Tigers Football and the Strike of 1959

Braddock-Pennsylvania

by Greg Nichols For reasons that had nothing to do with Eisenhower, Taft-Hartley, or the Supreme Court, the air above Braddock was electric on November 6, 1959. It was game day, and the Tigers were playing their biggest rivals, neighboring

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Posted in Contemporary History, Sports History

The Legend of the Braddock Tigers

Braddock-Pennsylvania

by Greg Nichols Big Bertha, a massive driving sled, haunted the Tigers’ dreams. It was rare for high school football teams to use sleds in the late 1950s, and rarer to see anything larger than a two-man version. Big Bertha

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Posted in Contemporary History, Sports History
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