The First Barbary War 1801–05

First Barbary War

Editor: Michael Spilling and Consultant Editor: Chris McNab

American Battles and Campaigns – First Barbary War 1801–05

The First Barbary War (1801–1805), also known as the Tripolitanian War and the Barbary Coast War, was the first of two Barbary Wars between the United States and the four North African states known collectively as the “Barbary States”. Three of these were nominal provinces of the Ottoman Empire, but in practice autonomous: Tripoli, Algiers, and Tunis. The fourth was the independent Sultanate of Morocco. The cause of the war was pirates from the Barbary States seizing American merchant ships and holding the crews for ransom, demanding the U.S. pay tribute to the Barbary rulers. United States President Thomas Jefferson refused to pay this tribute. Read more ›

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Posted in Military History

Lt. General (Ret) Michael T. Flynn: The Mistakes of the Iraq War

Michael T. Flynn

by Lt. General (Ret) Michael T. Flynn and Michael Ledeen

Lt. General (Ret.) Michael T. Flynn spent 33 years as an intelligence officer. Before he was terminated from government service, he served as the Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency and the Senior Military Intelligence Officer in the Department of Defense. He has since run for Donald Trump’s Vice Presidential nominee and now gives his account of the mistakes of the Iraq and Afghanistan Wars. Read more ›

Posted in Military History

The Siege of Yorktown, 28 Sep–19 Oct 1781

The Battle of Yorktown

Editor: Michael Spilling and Consultant Editor: Chris McNab

American Battles and Campaigns – The Siege of Yorktown, 28 Sep–19 Oct 1781

The final decisive major battle of the war, the siege of Yorktown established both the collapse of the British ‘Southern Strategy’ and Prime Minister Lord North’s ability to prosecute the war further. After a series of reverses and costly battles in the Carolinas, plus the hoped-for masses of loyalists not flocking in vast numbers to his army, British Gen Charles Cornwallis shifted his 7000 remaining troops into Virginia, having sent 2000 to the New York area in response to George Washington’s plans to assault the main British foothold in the colonies. Read more ›

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Posted in Military History

Swamp Gas: UFOs and the Ford Administration

Swamp Gas

by Larry Holcombe

Swamp Gas

Over a period of six days in March 1966, UFOs were seen by hundreds of people in southern Michigan and Ohio, in an area between and around Toledo and Detroit. Later classified as swamp gas, on March 14, in the early morning darkness a number of police officers from Washtenaw, Livingston, and Monroe counties viewed objects that darted about the sky moving very fast and making sharp turns. The objects would dive, hover, and shoot straight up while changing colors. Citizens were also seeing the objects and were calling the various police departments to report the sightings. Monroe County sheriff’s office contacted Selfridge Air Force base and was told that the base had uncorrelated targets over Lake Erie. Read more ›

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Posted in Contemporary History, Military History

Otto Wollank: The House by the Lake

Otto Wollank; Gross Glienicke lake

by Thomas Harding

WOLLANK 1890

Sitting astride his horse, Otto Wollank made his way slowly through a narrow avenue of ripening vines, towards a lake, shimmering in the early-morning light. The way was sandy and treacherous, he had to be careful that his mare did not slip on one of the many stones, or brush up against the gnarly, twisted branches that marked his path. But there was no rush, for Otto was in a contemplative mood, considering whether he should acquire the estate through which he rode. Read more ›

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Posted in Modern History
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