D-Day: The Tale of Two Brothers

Juno Beach Landings, June 6, 1944

Who were Charles and Elliot Dalton?

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

Sidney Gottlieb and the CIA Search for Mind Control

by Stephen Kinzer

The visionary chemist Sidney Gottlieb was the CIA’s master magician and gentlehearted torturer—the agency’s “poisoner in chief.” As head of the MK-ULTRA mind control project, he directed brutal experiments at secret prisons on three continents. He made pills, powders, and potions that could kill or maim without a trace—including some intended for Fidel Castro and other foreign leaders. He paid prostitutes to lure clients to CIA-run bordellos, where they were secretly dosed with mind-altering drugs. His experiments spread LSD across the United States, making him a hidden godfather of the 1960s counterculture. For years he was the chief supplier of spy tools used by CIA officers around the world.

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Posted in Modern History

D-Day: The Utah Beach Landings

Utah Beach Landings

by Giles Milton

Who was Leonard Schroeder? And how did he write himself into the history books on D-Day? Turns out he was destined to play a crucial role in the first wave of Allied landings on Utah Beach.

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Posted in Military History

Condé Nast: The Man and His Empire

by Susan Ronald

Condé Nast might have wondered why a publisher should feel like the ringmaster of a circus that would put Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey’s to shame. True, he aimed to create the “most excellent and stunning greatest show,” albeit in the publishing world. Did that mean he was expected to tame and shackle his employees to prevent them from behaving like wild animals? He would have been discomfited by the image racing through his mind. He was a quiet, reflective sort of chap, never garrulous or given to outbursts of bad temper.

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

Alone at the March: A Firsthand Account of the Dream Speech

by Clayborne Carson

I saw Martin Luther King Jr. proclaim his Dream at the 1963 March on Washington. King captured the nation’s attention, and his legacy ultimately became the focus of my career. In the days before the march, however, my understanding of his significance changed when I met Stokely Carmichael, a young black activist affiliated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Stokely made me aware that King was only one aspect of a sustained Southern freedom struggle to overcome the Jim Crow system of racial segregation and discrimination. Although I continued to admire King, I learned that the brash protesters and “field secretaries” of SNCC were key components of a community of dedicated activists I would come to know as the Movement. They exemplified the rebelliousness and impatience I felt as a teenager.

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Posted in Modern History

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