Condé Nast: The Man and His Empire

by Susan Ronald

Condé Nast might have wondered why a publisher should feel like the ringmaster of a circus that would put Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey’s to shame. True, he aimed to create the “most excellent and stunning greatest show,” albeit in the publishing world. Did that mean he was expected to tame and shackle his employees to prevent them from behaving like wild animals? He would have been discomfited by the image racing through his mind. He was a quiet, reflective sort of chap, never garrulous or given to outbursts of bad temper.

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

Alone at the March: A Firsthand Account of the Dream Speech

by Clayborne Carson

I saw Martin Luther King Jr. proclaim his Dream at the 1963 March on Washington. King captured the nation’s attention, and his legacy ultimately became the focus of my career. In the days before the march, however, my understanding of his significance changed when I met Stokely Carmichael, a young black activist affiliated with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC). Stokely made me aware that King was only one aspect of a sustained Southern freedom struggle to overcome the Jim Crow system of racial segregation and discrimination. Although I continued to admire King, I learned that the brash protesters and “field secretaries” of SNCC were key components of a community of dedicated activists I would come to know as the Movement. They exemplified the rebelliousness and impatience I felt as a teenager.

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Posted in Modern History

D-Day and the Battle for Merville

Merville Battery Memorial

by Giles Milton

Who was Terence Otway? And why was he chosen to capture one of the biggest German bunkers in the early hours of D-Day? Turns out that he was one of the most extraordinary Allied commanders to fight against the Germans on June 6, 1944. Read more ›









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Posted in Military History, Modern History

The History Behind the Mystery: Shamed

by Linda Castillo

If you’ve traveled to Holmes County, Ohio, you’ve probably seen the quaint farms with the iconic bank barns and corn silos, the horse-drawn buggies, the men with long beards and flat-brimmed hats, and the women clad in below-the-knee dresses, their heads covered with organdy prayer “kapps.” Holmes County is home to the second largest population of Amish in the world, a hair behind Lancaster County Pennsylvania. It’s the heart of traditional America and chock full of bucolic scenery like covered bridges and fields plowed with horse-drawn equipment. It’s one of the prettiest and most unique destinations in the U.S.

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Posted in Contemporary History, Early Modern History

One of the Most Dangerous Missions of D-Day

D-Day soldiers leaving a boat

by Giles Milton

Who was James Eads? And why did he find himself in such danger in the early hours of June 6, 1944? Turns out he was spearheading a mission of such danger that neither he nor his comrades expected to come out of it alive.

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

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