Friendship in the American Frontier: Wild Bill and Buffalo Bill

Buffalo Bill Cody

by Tom Clavin

They were the two most famous plainsmen of the American West, and they shared the same first name. Well, sort of. William Cody came to be known as Buffalo Bill and James Butler Hickok came to be known as Wild Bill.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Modern History

The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World

by M. R. O’Connor

Wayfinding is a fascinating look, both sweeping and intimate, at how finding our way makes us human. O’Connor takes readers all over the world, from the frigid Arctic to Australia, talking to master navigators, scientists, and scholars along the way. This captivating journey charts humanity’s profound capacity for wandering, memory, and storytelling, and it explores how exercising the brain through wayfinding can preserve the health of the hippocampus. Keep reading for an excerpt of Wayfinding.

Read more ›

Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Ancient History

The Softer Side of Wild Bill Hickok

Calamity Jane

by Tom Clavin

It should surprise no one that Wild Bill Hickok was a ladies’ man. As detailed in my book Wild Bill there were quite a few romances during his too-short life, some with local ladies referred to as “Indian Annies” in the towns he passed through. Some affairs, however, were more serious than others.

Read more ›









Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Modern History

The History Behind the Mystery: Death of a New American

by Mariah Fredericks

Around the age of 14, I started to fall in love with Italian men. I fell hard for 70s actors like Al Pacino and Robert DeNiro. I adored New York’s governor Mario Cuomo. I was mad for Martin Scorsese. But as the author of a mystery series, when I decided to tackle the Italian American experience at the turn of the 20th century, I became acutely aware of two things: most of my adored images came from mob movies—and many Italian Americans had serious issues with those movies and the way they sold the image of Italians as career criminals, incapable of following the laws and customs of the United States. Some of the books I read on the Italian American history in New York avoided all but the briefest mention of the mafia altogether, refusing to dignify what the authors saw as exploitative and damaging myth. Read more ›









Tagged with: , , ,
Posted in Modern History

The League of Wives: Women Who Fought to Bring Vietnam POWs Home

by Heath Hardage Lee

On February 12, 1973, one hundred and sixteen men who, just six years earlier, had been high flying Navy and Air Force pilots, shuffled, limped, or were carried off a huge military transport plane at Clark Air Base in the Philippines. These American servicemen had endured years of brutal torture, kept shackled and starving in solitary confinement, in rat-infested, mosquito-laden prisons, the worst of which was The Hanoi Hilton.

Read more ›









Tagged with: , , , ,
Posted in Military History, Modern History

The History Reader Newsletter