American Rebels: The Education of Hancock and Adams

by Nina Sankovitch

In the following excerpt from American Rebels, Nina Sankovitch discusses the education of John Hancock and John Adams from childhood schoolhouses and tutors to Harvard.

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Posted in Early Modern History, Military History

The Spanish Influenza Pandemic of 1918: An Indicator of Things to Come?

by Philip Jett

It was 1918 and there was a killer on the loose. Worse than any serial predator in modern history, its deadly grasp was swift, its hold resolute, and its thirst for killing unquenchable. No one was safe. It tracked down its victims in their homes and businesses, on city streets and farms. It cared nothing of royalty, wealth, age, race, gender, or national origin. The industrial revolution only encouraged it and modern advances in medicine could do little to slow it. The invisible monster’s name was the Spanish influenza.

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Posted in Contemporary History, Modern History

It Wasn’t All About Taxes: Royal Tampering With the Colonial Courts and the American Rebellion

by Nina Sankovitch

Taxes, duties, and the stationing of troops to enforce payment of both were all causes of the American rebellion against the British. But not the only causes.

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Posted in Early Modern History, Military History

The Last Voyage of the Andrea Doria: “A Living Testament to the Importance of Beauty in the Everyday World”

By Greg King and Penny Wilson

In The Last Voyage of the Andrea Doria, Greg King and Penny Wilson offer a fresh look at the legendary liner and her tragic fate. Andrea Doria represented the romance of travel, the possibility of new lives in the new world, and the glamour of 1950s art, culture, and life. Read an exclusive excerpt here.

Bonus: Enter for a chance to win your copy of The Last Voyage of the Andrea Doria!

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

Voyage of Mercy: “The Distress is Universal”

by Stephen Puleo

Ireland, 1846. Father Theobald Mathew implores assistant secretary at the British Treasury, Charles Trevelyan, to provide aid to Ireland as the potato blight ruins crops across the country. Read on for an excerpt from Voyage of Mercy.

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Posted in Modern History

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