Gettysburg in Pictures

By Callie Oettinger
Barlows’ Knoll after first day’s battle, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, northwest of town. July 1, 1863. Credit: National Archives.

Barlows’ Knoll after first day’s battle, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, northwest of town. July 1, 1863.
Credit: National Archives.

Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863. Credit: National Archives.

Headquarters of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg, 1863.
Credit: National Archives.

 

Amputation being performed in a hospital tent, Gettysburg, 07/1863. Credit: National Archives.

Amputation being performed in a hospital tent, 07/1863.
Credit: National Archives.

 

Three “Johnnie Reb” prisoners captured at Gettysburg, 1863. Credit: National Archives.

Three “Johnnie Reb” prisoners captured, 1863.
Credit: National Archives.

 

Regiment marching down a village street, Gettysburg, Pa, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865. Credit: National Archives.

Regiment marching down a village street, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865.
Credit: National Archives.

 

Union breastworks. Interior view of breastworks on Little Round Top, Gettysburg, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865. Credit: National Archives.

Union breastworks. Interior view of breastworks on Little Round Top, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865.
Credit: National Archives.

Part of Gettysburg Battlefield, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865. Credit: National Archives

Part of Gettysburg Battlefield, ca. 1860 – ca. 1865.
Credit: National Archives

War veteran John Burns seated outside in a rocking chair with his musket propped near the door to a building, ca 1861-1865. Credit: Library of Congress.

War veteran John Burns seated outside in a rocking chair with his musket propped near the door to a building, ca 1861-1865.
Credit: Library of Congress.

Col. Davis and staff of 69th Pennsylvania Infantry, Gettysburg, PA. June 1865. Credit: Library of Congress

Col. Davis and staff of 69th Pennsylvania Infantry, Gettysburg, PA. June 1865.
Credit: Library of Congress

Gens. Sickles, Carr & Graham. Taken near Trostle’s barn, Gettysburg Battlefield – on spot where General Sickles lost his leg, July 2nd, 1863, ca 1886. Credit: Library of Congress.

Gens. Sickles, Carr & Graham. Taken near Trostle’s barn, Gettysburg Battlefield – on the spot where General Sickles lost his leg, July 2nd, 1863, ca 1886.
Credit: Library of Congress.

National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa., 1913. Credit: Library of Congress.

National Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pa., 1913.
Credit: Library of Congress.

 

Gettysburg, between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915. Credit: National Archives

Ca. 1910 and ca. 1915.
Credit: National Archives

 

Gettysburg, between ca. 1910 and ca. 1915. Credit: National Archives

Ca. 1910 and ca. 1915.
Credit: National Archives

 

Gettysburg, 1922. Credit: Library of Congress.

Gettysburg, 1922.
Credit: Library of Congress.

Union and Confederate Veterans Shaking Hands Across the Stone Wall at the 1938 “Blue and Gray Reunion” at Gettysburg, 1938. Credit: National Archives

Union and Confederate Veterans Shaking Hands Across the Stone Wall at the 1938 “Blue and Gray Reunion” at Gettysburg, 1938.
Credit: National Archives

 

Heroes of battle of Gettysburg paid tribute by surviving brothers-in-arms. Washington, D.C., May 30, Although there are only a few of the boys in blue and gray left, two of them were strong enough today, Memorial Day, to drop flowers from the air on the Gettysburg battlefield to honor their comrades who lost their lives in this historic battle of the Civil War. Here we see, left to right: William H. Jackson, 95, of Washington, D.C., 5/30/38. Credit: National Archives.

Heroes of the battle of Gettysburg paid tribute by surviving brothers-in-arms. Washington, D.C., May 30, Although there are only a few of the boys in blue and gray left, two of them were strong enough today, Memorial Day, to drop flowers from the air on the Gettysburg battlefield to honor their comrades who lost their lives in this historic battle of the Civil War. Here we see, left to right: William H. Jackson, 95, of Washington, D.C., 5/30/38.
Credit: National Archives.

 


CALLIE OETTINGER was Command Posts’ first managing editor. Her interest in military history, policy and fiction took root when she was a kid, traveling and living the life of an Army Brat, and continues today.

 

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

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