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The Battle of Cambrai–St Quentin, Sept 27 – Oct 9,1918

Cambrai-St Quentin

Editor: Michael Spilling and Consultant Editor: Chris McNab The attack on the Cambrai–St Quentin sector was intended as the British portion of a joint offensive all along the Western Front. French Marshal Ferdinand Foch, the architect of Allied strategy, wanted

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Posted in Military History

Lusitania: Triumph and Tragedy

Lusitania

by Greg King and Penny Wilson Lusitania Prologue Saturday, May 1, 1915 A rainy twilight fell over New York City on April 30, 1915. Spring was late that year: indeed, an unexpected blizzard had nearly paralyzed the city three weeks

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Posted in Modern History

The Military Dogs That Save Soldiers Lives

Buster

by Isabel George I am always, and will no doubt remain, in awe of the power of the partnership of war dog and handler. They are relationships borne out of service, often forged in war and always made for life.

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Posted in Military History

The Assassination of the Archduke: In the Shadow of the Throne

The Assassination of the Archduke

by Greg King and Sue Woolmans Chapter 1: In the Shadow of the Throne: The Assassination of the Archduke Far away from the glamour of a snowbound Vienna, a thin, pale young man with watery blue eyes was enjoying his

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Posted in Modern History

Who Really was America’s First Flying Ace: The Case for Eddie Rickenbacker

Eddie Rickenbacker-Enduring Courage

by John F. Ross In Spring of 1918, during World War I, two American pilots entered a fierce competition to become the first ace in American service by shooting down five confirmed enemy airships. They both couldn’t have been cut

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Posted in Military History, Modern History

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