Blog Archives

Anne Royall: Common Scold

by Jeff Biggers Bloody feet, sisters, have worn smooth the path by which you have come hither. —Abby Kelley Foster, National Women’s Rights Convention, 1851 In the summer of 1829, more than a century after Grace Sherwood had been plunged into the Lynnhaven

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Posted in Modern History

The Lordly Roscoe Conkling

by Scott S. Greenberger Despite his promising start as a young man, by his early fifties Chester A. Arthur was known as the crooked crony of New York machine boss Roscoe Conkling. For years Arthur had been perceived as unfit

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Posted in Modern History

The Mayflower Compact

by Rebecca Fraser Although the Mayflower’s crew were experienced sailors—Captain Jones had spent a lifetime transporting wine, while the two pilots or mates, John Clarke and Robert Coppin, had previously been to Virginia and New England—Jones had never travelled beyond

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Posted in Modern History

The Story of the Real Ichabod Crane

by Philip Jett “It was the very witching time of night that Ichabod, heavy-hearted and crestfallen, pursued his travel homeward. . . ” In Washington Irving’s 1820 classic short story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the principal character (with a

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Posted in Contemporary History, Military History

Alexander Cochrane and the Enduring Myths of the War of 1812

War of 1812

By Willard Sterne Randall The War of 1812, often called “the forgotten conflict,” is probably the least understood American war. Just as frequently, it is described as the Second War of American Independence. This is because of a persistent fallacy

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Posted in Modern History
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