Blog Archives

Jeffersonian Federalism and the Origins of State Rights

Jeffersonian Federalism

by Kevin R. C. Gutzman Thomas Jefferson’s name is most commonly associated in American popular culture with what we now call “democracy,” which Jefferson’s friend and collaborator James Madison called “republicanism”: government by elected officials. Abundant evidence supports that Jefferson

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Posted in Modern History

The Kennedy Circle: A New Powerful Masculine Mystique

Kennedy Circle

by Steven Watts In 1959 JFK stood as a youthful political leader, with an allure more akin to that of a movie star or popular singer at the forefront of a movement to overcome a crisis of masculinity in postwar

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Posted in Modern History

When JFK Endorsed The Ugly American

Ugly American

by Steven Watts In the crisis of masculinity that preoccupied so many in late 1950s America, a few beacons of hope pierced the gloominess. Cosmopolitan, in its 1957 special issue examining the conundrums of the modern American male, included a

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Posted in Contemporary History

Understanding the Language of War: Tony Blair and Winston Churchill

Tony Blair

by Mark Thompson It’s May 13, 1940. Winston Churchill has been prime minister of the United Kingdom for three days. This is his first speech to the House of Commons as the nation’s leader. It is also day four of

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Posted in Military History

Theodore Roosevelt: The Original War on Terror

by Michael Wolraich Theodore Roosevelt and Terrorism Some years ago, an unstable young man committed one of the most notorious terrorist acts in U.S. history. He was American-born, but his parents were immigrants, and his allegiance to a radical ideology

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Posted in Modern History
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