Blog Archives

Henry James, the Bowery, and New York Jews

by Alice Sparberg Alexiou In 1904, at the apex of his career, Henry James came home from Europe for the first time in more than 20 years. He’d written many books—Daisy Miller, The Wings of the Dove, What Maisie Knew, Portrait

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Posted in Modern History

The Story of the Real Ichabod Crane

by Philip Jett “It was the very witching time of night that Ichabod, heavy-hearted and crestfallen, pursued his travel homeward. . . ” In Washington Irving’s 1820 classic short story, The Legend of Sleepy Hollow, the principal character (with a

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Posted in Contemporary History, Military History

The 18th-Century Politics of Santa Claus in America

by Judith Flanders Instead of deriving from folklore, or quaint colonial customs, or religion, the American emergence of Santa Claus was rooted in late-eighteenth-century politics, in the formation of clubs and societies based around ethnic or cultural groups, which came

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Posted in Modern History

Seymour Berkson: An Open Letter to the Mad Bomber

Seymour Berkson

by Michael Cannell Seymour Berkson may have been the only New Yorker to recoil at the sight of the psychiatric profile published on the front page of The New York Times on Christmas Day, 1956.

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Posted in Contemporary History

Marilyn & Truman: Beautiful Children of NYC

by Elizabeth Winder 1955. It’s springtime in New York and unseasonably balmy. Cherry blossoms dot Central Park with pale pink, and “Melody of Love” drifts from the radio. The Pajama Game is on Broadway, Dean Martin and Jerry Lewis are on

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Posted in Contemporary History

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