Blog Archives

The Golden Age of the Pullman Car

by Jack Kelly 2019 marks the 150th anniversary of the completion of the first transcontinental railroad. When builders pounded the golden spike at Promontory Point, Utah, on May 10, 1869, they opened a new era in transportation. But long train

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Posted in Modern History

The First Wells Fargo Detective

by John Boessenecker For fifteen years, Henry Johnson had his hands full as Wells Fargo’s pioneer detective. The company built its reputation on safety and security. From the time of its founding, it guaranteed delivery and paid its customers for

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Posted in Early Modern History

Alexander Cochrane and the Enduring Myths of the War of 1812

War of 1812

By Willard Sterne Randall The War of 1812, often called “the forgotten conflict,” is probably the least understood American war. Just as frequently, it is described as the Second War of American Independence. This is because of a persistent fallacy

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Posted in Modern History

The Broadcasting Legend Who Discovered T. E. Lawrence

T.E. Lawrence

by Mitchell Stephens During the First World War Lowell Thomas was confirming—as he zipped to Europe, through Europe and then to the Middle East— that being in motion was his preferred state. And the direction he preferred for all this

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Posted in Contemporary History, Military History

Amy Lowell: Making the World Safe for Poetry

Amy Lowell

by Nina Sankovitch In December 1917, Amy Lowell’s local newspaper, The Brookline Chronicle, ran a notice that caught her eye. U.S. Army training camps were in need of books for their libraries.  Amy called up Miss Louisa M. Hooper of the

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Posted in Modern History

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